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Sunday
24 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-24 Sunday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Breakfast with Olivier, spent much of the day and late into the evening creating product description slides, caught up with Frank later.

Saturday
23 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-23 Saturday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Helped to pack babes off to the Insane Terrain fund-raising run for Youth for Christ, packed for Mexico City - long series of trains, a very long plane ride.
  • Listened to a sermon from All Souls by Ross Hendry on Equal Pay; lots of interest but:
    • Obligatory John Stott quote: "Total egalitarianism is not the Christian goal for God himself has not mandated us to be identical either in our nature or spiritual endowments. What Christians should seek to ensure is that all differentials are due to merit not privilege."
    • A godly worker opposes discrimination; recognizing the equal worth of all should yield equal pay (for equal work).
    • We should also oppose pay that causes enmnity & envy. since large pay disparities can quickly make us become dissatisfied. We should oppose the love of money generally; and more.
    Interesting, of course, internationally PPP considerations can blur the picture - but the scandal of unequal pay is clearly a worthy thing to fight. On the politics of envy and suspicion around pay, a Christian involved in a Union presumably also has a tough task to avoid stirring up envy.
  • Arrived, sleep.

Friday
22 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-22 Friday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • M. off on a coach-trip to France. Admin, mail-chew, TDF board call, admin. Bid 'bye to H. on her DofE hike. Watched Get smart with the babes.

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Adapted from announcement to opensuse-factory mailing list:

Adding to the variety of metrics already captured at metrics.o.o, I have added download.o.o access metrics. These metrics are sourced from the Apache access logs produced by the download.o.o machine. The goal of parsing the logs was to provide some insight into product adoption and long-term usage, in addition to overall project health.

unique by product (stacked)

The logs cover data from 2018-06-20 (and ingested daily going forward) to 2010-01-03 and amount to roughly 24TB of raw data. After exploring a few tools, like telegraf (since commonly paired with influxdb), they were found to be lacking in the speed department. For example, telegraf could not even handle 1000 entries per second which would require well over three years to parse the data (reduced to over 6 months using concurrency if it supported that). Influxdb also couldn’t handle the raw data (even a single day) as I had hoped to use it to perform the aggregations. As such, short of finding a magic tool which would still require customization for the custom log fields and meaning I opted to write a tool.

Given the speed sensitive nature of the problem I tested the primary scripting language of the openSUSE release tools, python, and compared it to PHP which I knew is generally faster. A simple test running a “starts with” on each log file line was an order of magnitude faster in PHP and the difference widened the more processing that was added. As such I opted for using PHP which was fast enough for the job while providing scripting language convenience. The end result was ~500,000 entries per second per core with full concurrency supported. Using this solution the last 8 years of data was processed and summarized in ~23 hours using 7 cores of an office machine. Going forward only the last day needs to be summarized which takes a minute or so.

For those interested the 24TB was summarized to roughly 12GB of data which is then aggregated to roughly 8MB in influxdb. The 12GB lives on metrics.o.o in order to aggregate new days against previous data. The tool could be changed to drop data past the largest aggregation interval (ie a month), but if the aggregation algorithm is changed it would require the summary data.

For further details about the tool or to review it see metrics/access directory and README.

One of the areas of interest was the number of beta systems Leap receives. The release schedule for the last three releases of Leap may be used to annotate the graphs by enabling the corresponding annotation at the top of the dashboard. The individual product series may also be isolated by clicking the product in the legend (ctrl+click to select more than one to isolate). The time range may also be changed using the tool in the top right (next to refresh button) or by selecting the area on graph (left click


Thursday
21 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-21 Thursday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Breakfast, dropped Miklos to the station; some mail chew. Lunch, monthly all-hands call, catchup with Lubos and Andras. Mail & planning. Tea, late customer call.

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People of the Builds! Another Sprint is over and here is what the OBS frontend team has achieved in the last two weeks (2018-06-04 to 2018-06-15). Releases OBS 2.9.3 Last week we released OBS 2.9.3. :tada: This release mainly targeted two security issues found by Marcus Hüwe, and some other minor improvements. And thanks to Luca Boccassi this release includes a couple of patches for building packages for Debian. :gift_heart: Features New layout based on...


Wednesday
20 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-20 Wednesday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Train to Cambridge, met Miklos & chatted into London, visited our lawyers briefly; on together for a day of meetings at the IET Savoy Place with Chris & Bob, fun. Out for dinner together & train + taxi home late; fun. Played with the Vive, bed late.

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The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users.

Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes.

The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30  package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3  3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.

Tumbleweed users started to receive the updates to KDE Applications 18.04.2 in snapshot 20180613, but the update to Plasma 5.13 was what caught most users’ attention. The KDE Community spent a considerable amount of time optimising the startup and minimising memory usage, which provided a faster time-to-desktop and better runtime performance while using less memory consumption. Plasma 5.13 has a new system settings redesign, a new look and more features with its software and addon installer Discover. Two other notable changes in the 20180613 snapshot were updates to ceph 13.2, which fixed python3 loading module, and an update of the head branch to GCC8. Mesa 18.1.1 and perl-Image-ExifTool 11.00 were also updated in the snapshot.


Tuesday
19 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-19 Tuesday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Mail chew; built ESC proto-agenda, monthly commercial call. Sync with Miklos, interview.

Monday
18 June, 2018


Michael Meeks: 2018-06-18 Monday.

21:00 UTCmember

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  • Presents at breakfast - seems having spent a year telling people I'm actually 41 (by mistake) I now am (I think); early onset senelity apparently.
  • Mail chew; plugged away at OpenSSL's BIO / handshaking pieces around outbound connections. Birthday tea - steak & baked alaska.

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I never considered using encrypted folders. But when the KDE project announced it with the release of the Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, it made total sense. Just like KDE Connect, this is one of these killer features that can convince people to give Linux a try. With the release of openSUSE Leap 15, it was the perfect time to test this application.

Installing Plasma Vault

The easiest way to install Plasma Vault, is to search in YaST Software Manager for plasma-vault, check the box next to it and click on Accept and then on Continue.

Creating a vault

Creating a vault can be done from the system tray by clicking the Lock button, which will open the Vaults pop-over window. Click on the big button “Create a new Vault…” and a new window will open.

Type in a suitable name, click Next.

Now you will get a warning that the encryption method EncFS is not 100% secure. If you want to read more about this, there is a comparison article on the website of CryFS that explains it in easy terms. By the way, you can also install the CryFS backend in YaST. However, I would recommend that you stick with EncFS for now, as CryFS has received a fix in the Plasma 5.13 release. Click Next.

Provide a secure password for your vault. In general, the best advice is use an application like KeePassX to help you generate a long and random password. Otherwise try making your password long (12-20 Characters) and use a combination of lower letters, capital letters, numbers and symbols. Click Next.

The last thing you need to do is tell Vault where the folder should be mounted. You can use any folder location in your /home directory. By default it will create the folder in /home/username/Vaults/Foldername/. Click Next.

You can also limit the visibility of the Vault to certain activities. I don’t use activities, so I personally don’t do this. Click Create. Your vault is now configured.

Using the vault

You can use the vault from the applet in the system tray. Open the Encrypted folder with your favorite file manager.

Place a file in the vault, that you want to keep from prying eyes.

Now you can lock the encrypted folder by pressing the eject button.

If you manually browse to the location that you have indicated as the Mount point, you see no files.

You can unlock the encrypted folder by pressing the mount button and typing in your password.

Your files now magically turn visible in the mounted folder.

Testing issues

The only issue that I found with KDE Plasma Vault is that I am not able to delete my test vault from inside the pop-up window. This bug has already been reported and has been fixed in the KDE Plasma 5.13 release. If you want to delete an Encrypted folder, I would recommend you to use the work-around that is mentioned in the


Sunday
17 June, 2018


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I am happy to announce the release of Kraft version 0.81. Kraft is a Qt based desktop application that helps you to handle documents like quotes and invoices in your small business.

Version 0.81 is a bugfix release for the previous version 0.80, which was the first stable release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks5. Even though it came with way more new features than just the port, it’s first release has proven it’s stability in day-to-day business now for a few month.

Kraft 0.81 mainly fixes building with Qt 5.11, and a few other installation- and AppStream metadata glitches. The only user visible fix is that documents do not show the block about individual taxes on the PDF documents any more if the document only uses one tax rate.

Thanks for your suggestions and opinions that you might have about Kraft!


Thursday
14 June, 2018


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The release of openSUSE Leap 15 two weeks ago is following up with its Build to Scale theme by offering images for Raspberry Pis, Beagle Boards, Arndale board, CuBox-i computers, OLinuXino and more.

openSUSE has plenty of supported arm boards to allow makers to simply create. openSUSE is providing makers the tools to start, run and grow a project on micro devices to large hardware.

The new, fresh and hardened code base that supports modern hardware is stable and offers a full scope of deployments.

Makers can leverage openSUSE Leap 15 images for aarch64 and Armv7 on Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices. Since openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core  SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, makers who find success with a project or device can more comfortably transition to an enterprise product in the future should certifications become a requirement. Currently, the only IoT platform supported by SLE is the Raspberry Pi 3. However, there is no current supported migration from Leap 15 to SLE 15 with the Raspberry Pi. The barrier to entry in the IoT/embedded markets are lowered when a developer starts a project with Leap 15. Plus, the many supported arm boards can help developers circumnavigate future obstacles that might hinder project’s growth in a developing market.

Leap 15 brings plenty of community packages and developers using arm boards who are looking for a specific package should search for it on https://software.opensuse.org/ or use zypper.

The Armv7 images for NanoPi NEO, Beagle Bone and others are available at download.opensuse.org in Armv7 applications. Raspberry Pi images of openSUSE Leap 15 are available from the static webpage found on the openSUSE Raspberry Pi Wiki page.

openSUSE provided 10 Raspberry Pis for GNU Health to run 3.4 version with Leap 15. Find out more about GNU Health Raspberry Pis at http://health.gnu.org/embedded


Wednesday
13 June, 2018


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Weblate 3.0.1 has been released today. It contains several bug fixes, most importantly possible migration issue on users when migrating from 2.20. There was no data corruption, just some of the foreign keys were possibly not properly migrated. Upgrading from 3.0 to 3.0.1 will fix this as well as going directly from 2.20 to 3.0.1.

Full list of changes:

  • Fixed possible migration issue from 2.20.
  • Localization updates.
  • Removed obsolete hook examples.
  • Improved caching documentation.
  • Fixed displaying of admin documentation.
  • Improved handling of long language names.

If you are upgrading from older version, please follow our upgrading instructions, the upgrade is more complex this time.

You can find more information about Weblate on https://weblate.org, the code is hosted on Github. If you are curious how it looks, you can try it out on demo server. Weblate is also being used on https://hosted.weblate.org/ as official translating service for phpMyAdmin, OsmAnd, Turris, FreedomBox, Weblate itself and many other projects.

Should you be looking for hosting of translations for your project, I'm happy to host them for you or help with setting it up on your infrastructure.

Further development of Weblate would not be possible without people providing donations, thanks to everybody who have helped so far! The roadmap for next release is just being prepared, you can influence this by expressing support for individual issues either by comments or by providing bounty for them.

Filed under: Debian English SUSE Weblate


Sunday
10 June, 2018


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Software centers have become very important. Linux was the first place where you could install and update all software in one place, by using package managers. In openSUSE that central place is the YaST Software Manager. Other distributions, such as Ubuntu, used applications like the Synaptic package manager. The user experience of these package managers is not very user friendly, as they show many technical packages / details, which most users will not understand.

In 2008, Apple introduced the iOS App Store. This changed the public perception on how software centers should work. Everything was now in one place, neatly organized into categories. The screenshots, descriptions and ratings made it easy to learn about new software. And installation was a breeze. Google followed this trend by announcing Android Market later in 2008. Apple introduced the App Store for Mac OSX in 2010. Google re-branded the Android Market in 2012 to Google Play store. And in the same year, Microsoft introduced the Windows Store for Windows 8. This store was re-branded in 2017 to the Microsoft Store.

Within the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) world, Canonical was the first player to embrace this trend. They developed the Ubuntu Software Center and released it in 2009. The Ubuntu Software Center had the same features that made the iOS App Store great. After 2 years of steady development, the development pace slowed down. And more and more media outlets voiced their concerns on the lack of new features. They didn’t keep up with the big players anymore.

In 2013, the GNOME project released the GNOME 3.10 desktop environment. This included GNOME Software, an application for finding and installing applications. It was their version of the software center. And over the last 5 years it has been steadily developed. The pace hasn’t slowed down. You can now use it to install Flatpak applications. And in Fedora, it can now even be used to update the BIOS.

KDE was relatively late to the party. In 2015 KDE included the Muon package manager as part of the Plasma 5 desktop environment. Over the last few years, the user interface has gotten a big overhaul and Muon has been re-branded to KDE Discover. After having installed openSUSE Leap 15, I was very interested to see if KDE Discover worked as intended and could live up to bar set by the competition.

Testing KDE Discover

The first thing I noticed when opening KDE Discover, was that KTorrent was not installed on my machine. As this is a very nice program for downloading Linux ISO’s or video podcasts (shout-out to Jupiter Broadcasting), I decided to install that one first. After pressing the install button, the software downloaded. I clicked the Install button again and it gave me an error. Package not found (see below). I still liked to install KTorrent, so I opened the YaST Software Manager and installed KTorrent without any issues.

My next attempt was TuxGuitar. This is a fun application that makes


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openSUSE Samba

openSUSE is a very polished, commercial-feeling distribution of Linux. The architects of the distribution have a much larger scope in mind of its usage than what I generally do. One such area is Samba, SMB or often referred to as Windows Network File and Printer Sharing Protocol. I only use this for one device on my network, my All-in-One, Printer-Scanner-Copier, The HP OfficeJet 8600. It is a fine machine that does what I need it to do very well, but for scanning to a network folder, I must use Samba.

This process used to be much simpler, many years ago, before the discovery of security issues within Samba. She short story of why there is the separation was some sort of vulnerability in the underlying system. I am sure there is a fairly simple or straight forward way to make it all work but my intent was to successfully set up Samba with as little effort as possible.

I had a resource out on the web someplace that told me how to do this simply but I couldn’t find the bookmark nor was there a link in my digital notebook so I took a few sites, what I know about openSUSE and created an easy step-by-step guide for getting Samba file sharing up and running. I have broken down the process into six easy to follow steps for a minimal setup. I use this to quickly and easily set up and use Samba with openSUSE Linux.

Six Steps to a Simple Samba Setup on openSUSE

Package Installation

Minimum number of packages required to install the Samba Server

Service Activation

System Services that need to be activated and installed

Firewall Configuration

Allow access to the server through the firewall

YaST Samba Setup

Basic configuration using openSUSE’s system configuration tool.

Adding Samba Users

Through the terminal, setting the username and password

Testing it all out

Making sure it actually works.

Final Thoughts

Samba is pretty easy to set up for a minimal usage. For something more involved and complex, there are certainly better ways of accomplishing it. Finally, if HP decided to put SFTP on their future All-in-One devices, this entire write up, to me, would be useless but until then, this is what is required.

Further Reading

Six Steps to a Simple Samba Setup on openSUSE

Samba on openSUSE Wiki

Samba.org


Friday
08 June, 2018


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Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

This week was not very exciting for the users of Tumbleweed: not a single snapshot has been published since my last review. The reason for this is a sequence of ‘bad luck’

  • First, OBS was having some trouble with its caches and was simply overloaded. Building a new snapshot took more time than it should, so we decided to ‘let it settle’, which it then did
  • Once we were ready for a check-in, a new version of ‘product builder’ introduced a regression: the ISO files were no longer bootable when put on a USB drive. Considering this is a very common scenario, we did decide not to publish those ISOs (this would have been snapshot 0602; product-builder has been reverted since to get over this, and a fix, incl testing, is back in the pipeline
  • For snapshot 0603, Qt 5.11 was added. Turns out, that Kontact was affected badly and very frequently showed an error message. As it did not show at a 100% rate, this actually managed to slip through the staging process. A fix came in shortly after for and was in 0605.
  • Once snapshot 0605 was ready to test, it became apparent that the earlier mentioned issues managed to mask other underlying issues, namely, there seems to be a heft performance regression. A lot of tests are failing on timeouts now. Debugging this lead to identifying that snapperd seems to be crashing, which then resolves in coredumps being written out, and obviously slowing down the machine while this happens. A possible candidate to have provoked this much more frequent crashing of snapperd was identified in Kernel 4.16.13 (but not conclusively confirmed yet). So, we reverted the kernel to 4.16.12  for snapshot 0606, which is currently under testing.

I hope this gives you a bit of an insight into what happened this week and why there are no snapshots out yet. Of course, with all this going on, there are a few things accumulated to be delivered. The most interesting things there are:

  • Linux kernel 4.17
  • Qt 5.11
  • GCC 8 as the default compiler
  • FFmpeg 4
  • Plasma 5.13.0

During the next two weeks, I will hand over the release manager tasks around openSUSE Tumbleweed to Max Lin, as I’ll be trying to chase for the sun.


Thursday
07 June, 2018


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It seems PCs are getting complex cameras. Which is bad news for PCs, because existing libv4l2 will not work there, but good news for OMAP3, as there will be bigger pressure to fix stuff.


Wednesday
06 June, 2018


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Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.


Monday
04 June, 2018


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One of the most exiting new things about openSUSE Leap 15 is the updated KDE Plasma desktop environment. We are moving from Plasma 5.8 LTE to Plasma 5.12 LTE. Which means that there are a lot of new features to look forward to. Lets start with emphasizing that the KDE Plasma 5.12 desktop environment looks stunning. Below is a screenshot of my personal desktop, fully configured to my personal preferences. My configuration hasn’t changed much since KDE Plasma 4.3. I use 3 widgets: a folder view, an analog clock and a network monitor.

General improvements

The Plasma desktop environment has a new default desktop that uses the Folder view. This means that just like Windows, you can place all your icons on your Desktop. This change recognizes that most people stick to old habits. It might not be the best choice from an aesthetic point of view, however it is the best default to implement.

The second improvement is the ability to control your media from the lock screen. This only works with the traditional media players. So you can’t control music playing in your browser.

Task manager improvements

The task manager has received a lot of attention in the last few releases of the Plasma desktop. Two features deserve your attention. The first improvement is the ability to mute applications from the taskbar. This is really nice for quickly muting a browser playing videos.

The second improvement is the addition of jump lists. This is a very welcome feature. For instance, it allows you to quickly open recent documents from LibreOffice.

Notification improvements

There are also some nice improvements to the notification widget. The first one is that notifications are now persistent. In the past, when applications didn’t indicate that their notifications should be persistent, they disappeared after a while. Now all notifications are persistent by default, so that you can look back. Of course, you can always clear your history whenever you want.

The second nice feature is that when you save a screenshot (using Spectacle), you can now perform various actions from the notification screen, like open the containing folder or open the image with Gwenview.

Application launcher improvements

The application launcher has 3 different appearances:

  • Application Dashboard
  • Application Launcher
  • Application Menu

The application dashboard is a full screen application launcher that has been polished in the last few releases. This is an alternative to the Windows 8/10 full screen start menu or to the Apple MacOS full screen dock. The last time I tested this feature, it was quite buggy. But (based on my recent testing) it is now behaving properly.

The second option is the application launcher that behaves a lot like the Windows Vista start menu. All menus open within the same area (click-through). However, this application launcher is way better than the one from Windows Vista. It’s much more powerful as it uses the Krunner search back-end to quickly provide you access to your


Sunday
03 June, 2018


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Introduction: Installing Saltstack

The great thing about being able to spin up several new system containers running multiple Linux distros is that you get to experiment with software like Saltstack without the hassle of creating multiple VM’s. This can be especially daunting on a machine that is lacking resources.

The following directions are how I installed Salt on multiple containers running at the same time but using less that 2G of RAM total for testing. Saltstack easily controlled all of their very different package manager and system configurations effortlessly.

Master and Minion on OpenSUSE

zypper in salt-master salt-minion
echo "10.132.120.155" >> /etc/hosts
systemctl enable salt-master
systemctl start salt-master
systemctl enable salt-minion
systemctl start salt-minion

Minion on Fedora

dnf install salt-minion
echo "10.132.120.155" >> /etc/hosts
systemctl enable salt-minion
systemctl start salt-minion

Minion on Ubuntu

apt update
sudo apt install salt-minion
echo "10.132.120.155" >> /etc/hosts
systemctl enable salt-minion
systemctl restart salt-minion

Minion on Arch

pacman -S salt
echo "10.132.120.155" >> /etc/hosts
systemctl enable salt-minion
systemctl start salt-minion

Minion on CentOS

vim /etc/yum.repos.d/saltstack.repo (see https://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/topics/installation/rhel.html)
echo "10.132.120.155" >> /etc/hosts
yum install salt-minion
systemctl enable salt-minion
systemctl start salt-minion

Set up Salt Master

opensuse:~ # salt-key -A
The following keys are going to be accepted:
Unaccepted Keys:
opensuse
ubuntu.lxd
arch
fedora
centos
Proceed? [n/Y] y
Key for minion opensuse accepted.
Key for minion ubuntu.lxd accepted.
Key for minion arch accepted.
Key for minion fedora accepted.
Key for minion centos accepted.

Testing Saltstack

opensuse:~ # salt '*' grains.get os         
ubuntu.lxd:
    Ubuntu
centos:
    CentOS
arch:
    Arch
fedora:
    Fedora
opensuse:
    SUSE
opensuse:~ # salt '*' grains.get saltversion
fedora:
    2017.7.3
ubuntu.lxd:
    2017.7.4
centos:
    2018.3.0
opensuse:
    2018.3.0
arch:
    2018.3.0

Install a package

opensuse:~ # salt '*' pkg.install mutt
arch:
    ----------
    mailcap:
        ----------
        new:
            2.1.48+14+g5811758-1
        old:
    mutt:
        ----------
        new:
            1.10.0-1
        old:
centos:
    ----------
    mailcap:
        ----------
        new:
            2.1.41-2.el7
        old:
    mutt:
        ----------
        new:
            5:1.5.21-27.el7
        old:
    tokyocabinet:
        ----------
        new:
            1.4.48-3.el7
        old:
    urlview:
        ----------
        new:
            0.9-15.20121210git6cfcad.el7
        old:
fedora:
    ----------
    mailcap:
        ----------
        new:
            2.1.48-2.fc27
        old:
    mutt:
        ----------
        new:
            5:1.9.2-1.fc27
        old:
    perl-Time-Local:
        ----------
        new:
            1:1.250-394.fc27
        old:
    tokyocabinet:
        ----------
        new:
            1.4.48-9.fc27
        old:
    urlview:
        ----------
        new:
            0.9-22.20131022git08767a.fc27
        old:
opensuse:
    ----------
    exim:
        ----------
        new:
            4.86.2-20.1
        old:
    libgc1:
        ----------
        new:
            7.2d-11.3
        old:
    libgmime-2_6-0:
        ----------
        new:
            2.6.20-6.3
        old:
    libgpgme11:
        ----------
        new:
            1.9.0-1.3
        old:
    libkyotocabinet16:
        ----------
        new:
            1.2.76-16.1
        old:
    liblua5_2:
        ----------
        new:
            5.2.4-6.1
        old:
    libmysqlclient18:
        ----------
        new:
            10.0.34-32.2
        old:
    libnotmuch4:
        ----------
        new:
            0.22.1-3.17
        old:
    libpq5:
        ----------
        new:
            9.6.8-15.1
        old:
    libspf2-2:
        ----------
        new:
            1.2.10-8.1
        old:
    libtalloc2:
        ----------
        new:
            2.1.10-2.3.1
        old:
    libxapian22:
        ----------
        new:
            1.2.21-5.3
        old:
    mutt:
        ----------
        new:
            1.8.2-1.7
        old:
    mutt-doc:
        ----------
        new:
            1.8.2-1.7 

face

Introduction

LXC (Linux Containers) are whole-system containers. They are meant to be able to do just about anything you can do with a VM with a percentage of the system resources and and a tiny startup time.

During Installation:

During installation, you can pretty much choose defaults for everything except you will need to create two additional btrfs subvolumes and if you gave your VM more than 30G of space, you will need to specify that manually because the installer will only recognize 30G by default.

Create btrfs subvolumes for:
/snap
/media

After Installation

Add the snappy repo

sudo zypper addrepo --refresh http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/system:/snappy/openSUSE_Tumbleweed/ snappy

Create the last subvolume needed for snappy

sudo btrfs subvolume create /var/lib/snapd

Install snappy

sudo transactional-update pkg install snapd

reboot

Enable and start the snapd service

sudo systemctl enable snapd && sudo systemctl start snapd

Install the LXD snap

sudo snap install lxd

Setup

Initialize LXD

lxd init (choose defaults to make life easier the first time)

Create your first LXC container. The first time you create the container, LXD will download the image. After that any new containers build from that image will start very quickly.

lxc launch images:opensuse/42.3 opensuse

Enter into your first container

lxc exec opensuse bash

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Promote your event

Local open source community is bigger now and next step for you is to organize (or join) global conferences. One part of the organization is the promotion of the conference. You want to have as many visitors as you can.

I will try to write down what I did during openSUSE global conferences and some local events.

BEFORE THE EVENT

0. Web page

There MUST be a web page and a system that accepts registration, paper submission, information etc. Write everything that visitor should know about the conference.
We use OSEM in openSUSE. Check out https://events.opensuse.org

1. Blog blog blog.

You'll have some announcements for the conference. Dates, the place, new website, call for papers announcement, hotels that visitors can stay, schedule, keynote speakers etc. Usually, every open source project has a central blog or news site. You can write the articles there. Try to make fuzz by publishing your articles often.
Global communities can translate the announcements to their language and promote the conference locally.

Local communities are formed by members with blogs who publish on different planet sites. You can make a schedule so everyone can publish the announcement every other day. More eyes will see the announcement and will apply either as speaker or visitor.

Two things you want to have is contributors+visitors and sponsors. If your project is famous, then it's easy. If not, then you better publish the initial announcement to magazines, newspapers, technical blogs-sites. If you don't have access, then you better send it by e-mail or fax and then call them and ask them if they got the text. If they publish it, you're lucky.

Translate those announcements and publish them, so local population will see that there's a conference coming.


2. Promote to other FOSS conferences

There are plenty of FOSS conferences around the world.
* Community (local or global) has to apply for a booth and/or, if it's possible, present why someone should attend.
* At the booth, you should have promo materials of your conference and give away to local LUGs or hackerspaces to hang posters at their places.
* Another cool thing is to have free coupons for beer at the conference. If beer isn't the solution, then find another thing that can be found only at your conference and give free coupons.
* Wear special T-Shirts with the logo or #oSC or "Ask me for the conference". You show people that you're organizing something and can ask you questions.
* Finally, go to other project's booth and invite them. You can ask them if they want to have a booth at your conference or apply for a presentation.


3. Messages to post

Create a list of messages you'll post to social media.
First of all, you should post the announcements.
Then create a list of general messages that you should post before the conference. Content will be related to the subject of the conference or the country etc


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Community

We've seen how to gather some people and create a community (at least that's the quick tutorial how it worked for us in Greece).

The product is cool (any product) but here we have people. They should know WHY they join a community as volunteers. Is it because they want to help FLOSS to make the world a better place? Is it because it is Fun? Is it because they like the pros that open source provides? Is it because they like to help other people? Find out WHY people want to join-form a community.

The key to increase the number of the members is to attend to events. Here a quick tutorial how to do that. The best possible scenario is a developer to come to your booth and join the team. But this is 1% possible to happen (maybe less). Usually developers we're searching, they have their favorite distro/project and they don't change so easy.

The best thing is to join events where you can find end users (end users = users they're computer science students where they focus on windows, users that their computer being used for facebook/twitter/office suite). Why? Because those users can do some work that the developers hate. What's that?

0. Junior Jobs. Write a junior jobs list where someone can find exactly what to do and how to do it. The list could have the following.
1. Report bugs to bugzilla. So developers can fix it (of course developers have to be polite and help end users to provide possible broken data etc).
2. Documentation. Developers just hate to write documentation.
3. Translation. Usually developers use some "strange" language. So if someone asks you, please be polite and reply.
4. Promotion. Everyone call it marketing. The term marketing seems that the distro/project earns money out of promotion. Maybe the best term is engagement. This is needed because if it's the best distro/project among others, how more potential users will learn about it? And if it's the best, if no one uses it, then it's useless.

Usually end users join the community not because of the product but because of the people (remember to find your WHY people should join the community). They stay in the community ONLY because of the people. If he/she doesn't feel good, then he/she leaves. Unfortunately community is a number of volunteers. There's not someone that orders them to do something. If there's someone that will present the result of the community as his/hers, then people will leave and community terminates.
Sometimes, members expect something in return. If there's a company that supports your open source project, then maybe they expect material or money. It's not like that because as volunteer you're doing your hobby. If your hobby become your job later, that's the best for you.

So the question is how to keep the community


Friday
01 June, 2018


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Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

The openSUSE conference was a success – and Tumbleweed keeps on rolling. Since my last review, we managed to push out 5 snapshots (0524, 0525, 0528, 0529 and 0530). At the moment, the open Build Service seems to be overloaded, likely a lot of new Leap 15. repositories added, but I’m not sure. In any case, I’ll monitor the usage and will wait a bit to trigger the next snapshot. But let’s look at what fun stuff tumbleweed delivered to the users in the last week:

  • Linux kernel 4.16.11 & 4.16.12
  • Mesa 18.1.0
  • gdbm 1.14.1
  • openSSH 7.7p1
  • Perl 5.26.2
  • GStreamer 1.14.1
  • QEmu 2.12.0
  • bundle-lang-* were removed. In case you use –no-recommends, you likely will miss some translations now. Please install the respective -lang packages.

The various staging projects are currently filled with good things. AS mentioned earlier, delivery will have to wait a bit though to settle the resource usage of OBS. Once this calms down, you can expect those things to reach you:

  • Qt 5.11.0
  • FFmpeg 4
  • Newer Linux kernels
  • GCC 8 as distro default compiler
  • Plasma 5.13.0 (currently, the KDE team is actively testing 5.12.90 already)
  • Go 1.10

Michal Čihař: Weblate 3.0

12:00 UTC

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Weblate 3.0 has been released today. It contains brand new access control module and 61 fixed isssues.

Full list of changes:

  • Rewritten access control.
  • Several code cleanups that lead to moved and renamed modules.
  • New addon for automatic component discovery.
  • The import_project management command has now slightly different parameters.
  • Added basic support for Windows RC files.
  • New addon to store contributor names in PO file headers.
  • The per component hook scripts are removed, use addons instead.
  • Add support for collecting contributor agreements.
  • Access control changes are now tracked in history.
  • New addon to ensure all components in a project have same translations.
  • Support for more variables in commit message templates.
  • Add support for providing additional textual context.

If you are upgrading from older version, please follow our upgrading instructions, the upgrade is more complex this time.

You can find more information about Weblate on https://weblate.org, the code is hosted on Github. If you are curious how it looks, you can try it out on demo server. Weblate is also being used on https://hosted.weblate.org/ as official translating service for phpMyAdmin, OsmAnd, Turris, FreedomBox, Weblate itself and many other projects.

Should you be looking for hosting of translations for your project, I'm happy to host them for you or help with setting it up on your infrastructure.

Further development of Weblate would not be possible without people providing donations, thanks to everybody who have helped so far! The roadmap for next release is just being prepared, you can influence this by expressing support for individual issues either by comments or by providing bounty for them.

Filed under: Debian English phpMyAdmin SUSE Weblate


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After my last post quite some time ago, I had to revisit this issue again and found that there is a much easier way to "fix" the problem: Just add

GRUB_DISABLE_SUBMENU="y"
in /etc/default/grub, recreate your grub.cfg and voila: the submenus are gone.

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People of the Builds! Another Sprint is over and here is what the OBS frontend team has achieved in the last two weeks (2018-05-21 to 2018-06-01). Bugfixes: Patchinfo editor removes data As it was reported in #4895, after editing a patchinfo with an optional message element, the element was removed. This was fixed in #5010. Working on this issue lead us to add the missing optional version field and fix another issue related with the...


Thursday
31 May, 2018


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Three weeks from our last update on this blog. Time flies when you are busy! As you know, openSUSE Leap 15.0 was released in the meantime, which also means the active development of SLE15 is coming to an end… so time to look a little bit further into the future.

That’s why we had a face-to-face workshop with the whole YaST Team at the beautiful city of Prague during several days right before joining the openSUSE Conference 2018.

But we have done much more in three weeks than attending workshops and conferences. Apart from last-minute fixes, here you have a list of some interesting changes we have done in YaST in this period. Take into account that some of these changes didn’t make it into Leap 15.0, although all will be available in SLES15 and are probably already integrated into openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Fine tuning installer behavior in small disks

As you may know, the default installation of SLE and both openSUSE distribution enables Btrfs snapshots in the root partition alongside separate partitions for /home and swap. That means a default installation needs quite some space. In SLE12 and openSUSE Leap 42.X, if such disk space was not there the installer silently tries to disable the separate /home and even the snapshots in order to be able to create an initial proposal.

That behavior has become configurable for each product and role with Storage-ng and during the last sprint there was some controversy about what the configuration should be, both for openSUSE and the SLE family. It may look like a minor problem, but it becomes very relevant in virtualization environment (where virtual disks smaller than 10 GiB are not uncommon) or certain architectures with special storage devices like s390 and ARM.

The final decision was to never disable snapshots automatically in the case of openSUSE, so the user will be forced to manually go through the Guided Setup and explicitly disable snapshots to install in a small disk. In the SLE case, it was decided to keep the traditional behavior (automatically disabling snapshots if really needed) but making the situation more visible by adding a previous sentence to explain how the initial proposal was calculated.

So the installation in a normal disk would look like this.

Default initial partitioning proposal

While the installation in a very small disk displays some information similar to the following screen (the wording was slightly improved after taking the screenshots).

Adjusted initial partitioning proposal

The explanatory text preceding the list of actions will be available in all products based on SLE15, but will not be there for Leap 15.0, since the modification to the installer was not ready on time for the deadline and, moreover, would have been impossible to get the translations on time.

By the way, if you are interested in a more in-depth explanation on how the partitioning proposal adapts to all kind of situations like small disks and other scenarios, don’t hesitate to check Iván’s presentation at openSUSE Conference 2018


Tuesday
29 May, 2018


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A big release

On the 25th May 2018, openSUSE Leap 15 was released for download. Over the last few days I have upgraded both of my systems to this new release. Although this was a big release for openSUSE, the media attention for this release was surprisingly low. The reason why this is a big release, is that the underlying software packages are all new.

openSUSE Leap 42 has a shared core with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 (SLE 12). For instance Leap 42.2 shares a lot of software packages with Service Pack 2 (SLE 12 SP2). And Leap 42.3 shares a lot of packages with SLE 12 SP3. The shared core was on average 20% of the total number of packages. Because of that shared core, some of the packages were starting to show their age.

openSUSE Leap 15 shares a lot of software packages with SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, which in itself is based on a 2017 fork of openSUSE Tumbleweed. That means that all of the underlying packages in SLE 15 have been updated to a more current version in comparison to SLE 12 SP3. The shared core for openSUSE Leap 15 is (according to a FOSDEM 2018 presentation) about 27% of the total number of packages. And the remaining packages are originating from (an even more recent fork from) openSUSE Tumbleweed. Which means that we get a lot of improvements in openSUSE Leap 15.

A good example (to get an idea about the progress that has been made) is the underlying Linux kernel, which has been updated from version 4.4 to 4.12. Linux kernel 4.4 was released in January 2016 and Linux kernel 4.12 was released in July 2017. You cannot simply assume that the SLE kernel is identical to the upstream Linux kernel, because SUSE includes a lot of back-ports of security fixes and of hardware drivers in their kernels. However, you can assume that most of the newly introduced features in more recent Linux kernels are not being back-ported. So the upgrade from SLE 12 to SLE 15 means that we get 1,5 years of new features from the Linux kernel community.

So openSUSE Leap 15 is a big release. But is it any good? In this article I will focus on the installation experience.

Installation

I have installed openSUSE Leap 15 on 2 machines. The first one is a netbook: the Acer Aspire One 725. This machine has an AMD C70 chip set (CPU + GPU), 4 GB of DDR3 memory and a 120 GB SSD hard drive. The second one is a bare-bones desktop: the Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520. This machine has an Intel Core i5-4200U CPU, Intel HD Graphics 4400, 16 GB of DDR3L memory and a 256 GB SSD hard drive. For both machines I have opted for a fresh installation instead of doing an upgrade.

Every time I install a new openSUSE release, I evaluate whether to do an update or a fresh install

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