Welcome to English Planet openSUSE

This is a feed aggregator that collects what the contributors to the openSUSE Project are writing on their respective blogs
To have your blog added to this aggregator, please read the instructions

Mon, Apr 22nd, 2024

Anthias | Open Source Digital Sign Solution

I have previously written about digital sign solutions, not here, and I wanted to create an updated how-to on Anthias, which was previously known as Screenly OSE. Essentially, it is still Screenly but with its own more unique name for differentiation. Some things have changed and not all the instructions out there seem to work … Continue reading Anthias | Open Source Digital Sign Solution

Fri, Apr 19th, 2024

openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2024/16

Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

This week has been filled with 7 snapshots (0411, 0412, 0414, 0415, 0416, 0416, and 0418). From a staging perspective, things looked rather easy – which means the package maintainers have done a great job submitting things that work and have most likely been pretested. The most interesting changes during this week include:

  • Apache 2.4.59
  • Linux kernel 6.8.5 & 6.8.6
  • Pam 1.6.1
  • Kiwi 10.0.10 & 10.0.12
  • KDE Gear 24.02.2
  • KDE Frameworks 6.1.0
  • KDE Plasma 6.0.4
  • SDL3 (no consumers yet)

Staging projects are well balanced, some are in ready to accept for the next snapshots, some are building/testing and, as usual, some are failing tests. The most interesting changes currently being tested are:

  • Python 3.11.9 & 3.12.3
  • Linux kernel 6.8.7 & kernel-longterm 6.6.28
  • util-linux 2.40
  • libxml 2.12.6: a long-lasting attempt to get to 2.12.x – but the results are looking good by now. There are two packages left that are failing: VirtualBox & libqt5-qtwebengine. For both, there should be some fixes available.
  • dbus-broker: no progress this week
  • GCC 14: phase 2: use gcc14 as the default compiler – lots of help needed: https://build.opensuse.org/project/show/openSUSE:Factory:Staging:Gcc7

Btop | Terminal Based Resource Monitor

It seems that just like when I am happily excited about a tool I enjoy and still think it’s the new hotness, I find out it is no longer the new hotness and I’m just an old man that is seemingly behind the times… chronically… This is a brief overview of Btop, the terminal based, … Continue reading Btop | Terminal Based Resource Monitor

Thu, Apr 18th, 2024

openSUSE Factory enabled bit-by-bit reproducible builds

In March, the configuration for building openSUSE Factory was changed to be bit-by-bit reproducible (except for the embedded signature). Following this, the first openSUSE Tumbleweed packages were verified to be bit-by-bit reproducible.

Thank you to everyone who helped to make this happen. This was an important improvement.

It will take some time to do this verification for all packages to see how many of our packages are reproducible to this detail. Previous verifications, while ignoring some differences that this fixed, succeeded for more than 95 percent of packages.

Contribute

The effort on reproducible builds is a collaboration across many distributions. See how to contribute to reproducible builds in openSUSE.

Uses

Reproducible builds have a multitude of uses for security and quality. To further enhance their utility, reproducible builds need to be combined with other techniques such as distributed post-merge code review and capability based designs.

A recent example is that reproducible builds allow for the creation of proof, simply by rebuilding and comparing the result, that a GCC build whose source was extracted with a compromised xz was not compromised; this process was achieved without needing to reverse engineer how the compromise occurred. Similarly, reproducible builds were reported as being usefully during investigations of the xz compromise.

reproducible builds enable collaboration that otherwise would not be possible by supporting more scientifically-based arguments for security, which can be independently verified.

Filter SCM Events by multiple properties

Every time your source code management system (github, gitlab etc.) sends a webhook to OBS to trigger a SCM/CI Workflow, we give our best to record what is happening during (and in case of builds even after) your workflow’s steps run. We do this because this is a complicated feature, involving two very large applications, where lot’s of things can go wrong. So you need loads of information to debug once something is. We do...

Wed, Apr 17th, 2024

Windows Hello on Linux!

Check out authentication to Azure AD/Entra ID with a Windows Hello PIN on openSUSE Tumbleweed!

Here’s how to get started for yourself.

First, install the package in Tumbleweed:

sudo zypper in himmelblau nss-himmelblau pam-himmelblau

Next configure /etc/himmelblau/himmelblau.conf and set the parameter ‘domains’ to a comma separated list of allowed domains, then set ‘pam_allow_groups’ to a comma separated list of allowed users and groups. All other parameters in the himmelblau.conf are optional.

Configure pam:

sudo pam-config --add --himmelblau

You may need to do additional pam configuration. Check out the readme.

Disable nscd:

sudo systemctl stop nscd
sudo systemctl disable nscd
sudo systemctl mask nscd

Setup nss (just add ‘himmelblau’ to the end of passwd, group, and shadow):

# vim /etc/nsswitch.conf
passwd:     compat systemd himmelblau
group:      compat systemd himmelblau
shadow:     compat systemd himmelblau

Finally, start Himmelblau:

sudo systemctl enable himmelblaud himmelblaud-tasks
sudo systemctl start himmelblaud himmelblaud-tasks

You’re all set! Domain enrollment happens automatically the first time someone logs in. Each time a new user logs in, they’ll be prompted to enroll a Windows Hello PIN for the device (Hello PIN auth is introduced in Himmelblau 0.3.0). Subsequently, that user will authenticate with their Hello PIN.

Tue, Apr 16th, 2024

When it comes to sudo logging, pretty is not always better

Version 1.9.16 of sudo will introduce a new logging option: json_compact. This does not affect logging to syslog, only logging to files. Previously, sudo created human-readable JSON log files. With this new setting enabled, logs are no longer pretty but can be easily read by logging software.

As I am writing this blog, version 1.9.16 is not yet released, not even a beta. For now, if you want to test this feature, you will have to compile sudo yourself from source. Once 1.9.16 is released, it will be available here on the sudo website as ready to install package for major Linux and UNIX variants. And eventually it will officially become available in various operating systems, FreeBSD and rolling Linux distros first.

Read more at https://www.sudo.ws/posts/2024/04/when-it-comes-to-sudo-logging-pretty-is-not-always-better/

Sudo logo

Working with sudo’s json_compact logs in syslog-ng

Version 1.9.16 of sudo will feature a new option for logging: json_compact. Why is this important? This new format can easily be read and parsed by a log management software, like syslog-ng.

Note that in this blog I am showing you a sudo feature which has not yet been released officially. You have to compile sudo yourself. By all means, if you have any other application writing JSON-formatted log messages, you can apply most of what you read here with slight modifications.

Read the rest at https://www.syslog-ng.com/community/b/blog/posts/working-with-sudo-s-json_5f00_compact-logs-in-syslog-ng

syslog-ng logo

Mon, Apr 15th, 2024

openSUSE Leap Micro 6 Enters Alpha Stage

The openSUSE project is excited to announce that Leap Micro 6 is in its alpha development stage.

Building on the solid foundation of its predecessors, openSUSE’s Leap Micro 6 continues to provide a stable, secure and scalable platform for modern lightweight host operating systems that mirrors features and enhancements of SUSE’s commercial SL Micro release.

With the upcoming release of Leap Micro 6, users of Leap Micro 5.4 will need to plan their migration either to Leap Micro 5.5, directly to Leap Micro 6 or a commercial version, as version 5.4 will reach end-of-life upon the launch of Leap Micro 6. Those currently on Leap Micro 5.5 will have the option to upgrade to version 6 or remain on 5.5 until the subsequent release.

Users familiar with Leap Micro 5.5 will remember its standout features, such as enhanced SELinux capabilities, improved podman-docker and Hyper-V support for AArch64, which have significantly bolstered the security and versatility of the operating system.

Leap Micro 6 Enters Alpha Stage

The openSUSE project is excited to announce that Leap Micro 6 is in its alpha development stage.

Building on the solid foundation of its predecessors, Leap Micro 6 continues to provide a stable, secure and scalable platform for modern lightweight host operating systems that mirrors features and enhancements of SUSE’s commercial SL Micro release.

With the upcoming release of Leap Micro 6, users of Leap Micro 5.4 will need to plan their migration either to Leap Micro 5.5, directly to Leap Micro 6 or a commercial version, as version 5.4 will reach end-of-life upon the launch of Leap Micro 6. Those currently on Leap Micro 5.5 will have the option to upgrade to version 6 or remain on 5.5 until the subsequent release.

Users familiar with Leap Micro 5.5 will remember its standout features, such as enhanced SELinux capabilities, improved podman-docker and Hyper-V support for AArch64, which have significantly bolstered the security and versatility of the operating system.